1946

1946 Yearbook Text (pdf)

 

MODERN HISTORY ’46

 

We, the students of the Intermediateand Junior High grades of Mar-KenSchool, dedicate this our annual of1946 to Mrs. Bessire and to all ourwonderful teachers.

Especially to Miss Ross who through

patience and encouragement taught us

our “Three R’s” plus.

 

We are deeply grateful too, to Ruthie,

our teachers, Kent Bessire and every

one connected with Mar-Ken School.

 

 

 

FORWARD

 

This year we of the Annual Staff of

the Junior High and Intermediate

grades have tried to put out an interesting

book.  With the help of Miss Ross

we feel we have done this.  We

sincerely hope you agree with us.

 

The theme this year is Historical

Events.  We feel at this time it is

a fitting theme, for what is happening

today will surely be history in

time to come.  We have many articles

on peace and victory to develop this

historical theme.

 

 

CLASS ORGANIZATION

 

Every semester the Mar-Ken Junior High has a class election.  They elect a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and sometimes other officers.  Or these may appoint a librarian and house-keeper.

 

The elections are held according to rules so that we get some training in parliamentary rules.  We cannot nominate anyone until the presiding officer recognizes us and gives us the floor.  It is fun nominating and voting for each other.

 

The following are the officers for the first and second semesters.

 

I  SEMESTER

 

President .   .   .   .   .   .   .   Russell Gerling

Vice-president .   .   .   .   .   Owena Peterson

Secretary.   .   .   .   .   .   .   Pamela Payton

Treasurer.   .   .   .   .   .   .   Myonne Walsh

 

II SEMESTER

 

President .   .   .   .   .   .   .   Joel Davis

Vice-president  .   .   .   .   .   Donna Ardoff

Secretary .   .   .   .   .   .   .   Betty Joan Clark

Treasurer .   .   .   .   .   .   .   Ted Donaldson

 

 

 

 

 

 

LAST WILL AND TESTAMONT

of

JUNIOR HIGH of 1946

 

 

We, of the Eighth Grade, being of sound mind, do make and declare this our last will and testament.

 

Joel Davis leaves his corny jokes and daffynitions to Micky McGuire hoping he will improve them in the future.

 

Robin Levinson leaves her smile and her A’s in history to Gloria McGibbon.

 

Ted Donaldson wills his card tricks and ability to act to Robert Anderson.

 

Owena Peterson leaves her, “For corn’s sake,” to Donna Ardoff. It may need mending as I have almost worn it out.

 

Armand Noble leaves his stamp collection and his ability to talk to James Miller.

 

Marilyn Singer leaves her singing ability to Jacqueline Bredberg.

 

Russell Gerling leaves his brains, along with notebook, pencils, erasers and lunch to David Ackles.

 

Betty Clark leaves her acting ability and her dancing steps to Patsy Mae Flanigan.

 

We also leave five maps, more or less in good repair, all the history books, and arm chairs to those who shall follow us.

 

Done this fifteenth day of April in the Year of Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-six.

 

 

 

CLASS AMBITIONS

 

Nearly everyone has an ambition, some singing, dancing, acting, collecting or most anything you can think of or imagine.  So the Junior High Grades have been kind enough to let me know what their ambitions are and so now I am to let you know what they are.

 

Russell Gerling has been a very good musician since 1938.  He plays the piano.  Russell has also started thinking of acting since about 1943.

 

Owena Peterson it seems likes to travel as she wants to become a foreign nurse.  Owena has been thinking of this ambition since she was three years old.

 

Joel Davis who of course wants to become an actor six-foot-one and a comedian also said he would like to become a composer of music and lyrics.  Quite an ambition don’t you think?

 

Donna Ardoff as everyone knows wants to be a singer and actress.  But what you may not know is that she also wants to be a famous pianist.  She also told me that she wanted to be in pictures and radio ever since she can remember.

 

Armond Noble who has just recently come to this school said he just wanted to go through school, which is a hard task according to him.

 

Marilyn Singer wants to become a singer, which applies to her name.  She said she has always wanted to sing since she was a little girl.

 

James Miller told me that he wanted to become a paramarine, (which confidentially is the parachute branch of the Marine Corps.) He has been thinking of this since January 1945 and that is because he has two cousins in the Para Troops during the war.

 

Betty Joan Clark has been a dancer of top toe and Spanish since she was four years old.  She has always wanted to dance and act in pictures.  She has been thinking about radio and has admitted that she wants to act and sing on the radio.

 

Robin Levinson said she wanted to be an actress.  She also wants to write for a magazine leading up to the famous all American novel.

 

Pamela Payton wants to be an actress, dancer, and singer in pictures.  Pam has been thinking of this for about three years now.  She also does musical comedy.  Pam said its fun and she likes to do it.

 

Ted Donaldson as everyone knows is an actor in pictures.  He wishes to become one of the top actors of the time.  He has been in radio and wishes to continue in it.

 

CLASS REUNION OF 1960

 

   The Junior High Class of 1946 held a house party in the Mar-Ken Mountain Resort in the spring of 1960.  It ws great fun greeting each other after several years and seeing how many of us had reached what we wanted to be when we were children in the eighth grade at dear old Mar-Ken School.

Joel Davis of course is an actor in radio and television.  We know that Joel worked hard all his life and is now on the top.  He is also a good comedian so you know the laughs we had before the roaring fire each evening where we gathered after dinner.

Donna Ardoff the singer of her class is singing on the radio and in pictures.  She told me once that was her only ambition so we are all happy to see her fulfill that desire. Too bad her millionaire husband could not come along and meet her old friends at Mar-Ken.

Ted Donaldson is now a leading actor just as he was a leading child actor in 1946.  His hobby on the side now is being a magician like Chester Morris.  Ted put on a magic act for May Day Festival in 1946 at Mar-Ken but he has come a long way since then, as Pamela can tell you since he used her new spring bonnet in one act.  We are glad Russell was not there that night or he would have served rabbit stew next day to all.

Russell Gerling did however fly in next day from South America.  Russell is a famous scientist and Epicurean and came back to California just to see and visit his old school mates.  He laughed and told how he wore out two pairs of soles dancing the May Pole Dance on May Day.

Robin Levinson flew from New York where she is an editor on the Times.  She was a splendid editor of our Mar-Ken Journal and has just improved from year to year.  We know she will probably give us a good write-up about our reunion here.

Owena Peterson has been traveling all over the world since she is now a registered nurse.  She flew in from Rio de Janero with her husband to be our hostess here in the San Bernardino Mountains.  We are glad she was not called on to use any of her R.N. skill while we were here together.

James Miller who is now a foreign correspondent has spent much time in Asia sending news back to America.  We are glad his latest assignment was in California as that permitted him to attend the reunion.  James still knows how to talk.

Betty Clark is now singing and dancing with the best in pictures and radio.  Betty has done this since she was five years old so now she is writing for a change and is doing some fine stories. I hope she enjoys writing as much as we enjoy reading her short stories. Keep them up Betty.

Pamela Payton is often starred with Betty as she also sings, dances, and acts.  She has just received the Oscar for her acting and deserves a real rest after a full year of work.  She flew Betty up with her in her new helicopter.

Marilyn Singer has just returned from New York where she has been singing in the Opera.  I am glad she also sings on the radio as then we all get to hear her.  However she would not sing for us only to try Armond’s latest song hit.

Armond Noble has just purchased a $1,000,000 stamp for his collection, which is supposed to be the only one of its kind in existence.  This rates him as the world’s largest stamp collector.  He and Joel discussed their stamp collections and stamp trades at Mar-Ken.

MAR-KEN JUNIOR HIGH

 


             EDITORIAL

 

This term we of the staff of the Mar-Ken Journal of Junior High, wrote, stenciled and printed the paper ourselves.

 

At the first of the term we were fortunate in having Myonne Walsh as our art editor and I am sure you will agree with us in saying that she did a wonderful job.  We also had a good staff reporter, Pamela Payton.  The rest of our staff deserve their share of praise.

 

Our part of the paper always came out on time, thanks to the staff.  We had two excellent sub reporters who took care of the news from the Primary and Intermediate rooms.  These two reporters were Betty Joan Clark and Donna Ardoff.  We also wish to thank our circulation manager, (first of the term Marilyn Singer and now Owena Peterson) and our business manager, Joel Davis, for their marvelous part in selling the papers.  Now last, but certain not least, I wish to thank my two assistant editors, Susan McNellis and Marilyn Singer for their splendid cooperation.

 

We of the staff sincerely hope that we have made our part of the Journal interesting to you and that the Journal has been as enjoyable this term as it has been in the past.

 

 

 

 

 

STAFF

 

I SEMESTER 1945

 

Editor in chief . . . . . . .  Robin Levinson

Assist. Editor . . . . . . .  Susan McNellis

Art Editor. . . . . . . . . .  Myonne Walsh

Business Mang.. . . . . .  Joel Davis

Circulation Mang. . . . .  Marilyn Singer

Staff Reporter . . . . . .  Pamela Payton

Cub Reporters . . . . . .  Betty Clark

Donna Ardoff

 

 

 

 

STAFF

 

I I SEMESTER 1946

 

Editor in chief . . . . . .  Robin Levinson

Assist. Editor  . . . . . .  Marilyn Singer

Art Editor . . . . . . . . .  Myonne Walsh

Business Mang. . . . . .  Joel Davis

Circulation Mang.. . . .  Owena Peterson

Staff Reporters . . . .   Pamela Payton

Donna Ardoff

Betty Clark

Advertising . . . . . . .  Ted Donaldson

James Miller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1945-1946 Mar-Ken Junior High School Students]

 

 

Robin Anne Levinson

 

Owena Peterson

 

Betty Joan Clark

 

Joel Davis

 

James Miller

 

Marilyn Singer

 

Pamela Payton

 

Donna Ardoff

 

Armond Noble

 

Ted Donaldson

 

Russell Gerling

 

 

 

•                                   •                                   •                                   •                                   •

FRENCH AT MAR-KEN

 

French is a language everyone should know and study.  Many of our words are taken from the French Language.

 

Mrs. Rigler is our teacher.  Miss Circe taught us until her accident and she was unable to come to school.

 

We have conversational French and learn words for our vocabulary. We also learn to construct sentences, describe people and things as parts of the home and scenery.  We read stories in French and Mrs. Rigler asks questions about the story.

 

We lean so much French every day it is hard to remember it all especially the new words for our vocabulary list.

 

I think our French class is very interesting and important.

 

–   Pamela Payton

 

Buence Dios Senores y Senores

 

Every Tuesday and Thursday we have under Mrs. Rigler, who is really a very fine Spanish teacher.  We have learned to conjugate verbs, from a long list in our vocabulary and to read orally some Spanish stories which helps us with our pronunciation.

 

Spanish I think helps you learn the English language better.   Spanish is easy some ways but the pronunciation is sometimes more difficult than the English.  However we have all enjoyed the course.  Asta la vista.

 

HALLOWEEN AT MAR-KEN

 

Every year at Halloween a party is given at Mar-Ken.  This year it was on October 26, 1945, and everyone came in costume. The contest was for the funniest, the prettiest and most original costume.  The judges were Shirley Lloyd, Barbara Banks and Don Brown from the High School.

For the contest the Primary Department went through all the rooms first and past the judges.  Then came the Intermediate classes and last came the Junior High.

Sharon Smith was chosen the loveliest, Elso Peterman the most original and David Ackles the funniest from the Primary Grades.

Then from the Intermediate grades Bonnie Mae Webster was chosen loveliest, Karol Bush the most original and Eugene Hoffman the funniest.

From the Junior High, Betty Clark was chosen as the prettiest, Owena Peterson most original and Joel Davis the funniest.  He came In a regular suit because he didn’t bring his costume.  We turned his coat inside out and gave him a beard and mustache with lipstick belonging to one of the girls.  He really looked funny in a suit of several colors and all that color on his face.

Betty Joan Clark was a Spanish girl and she wore a short full swing skirt with red flowers in her hair, so it was easy to see why she would win a prize.

Owena Peterson was a French pastry girl. It was very original.  She had a tray of pastry which she passed to all those in her room from time to time.

After the contest each room played Halloween games, ate refreshments and took pictures of the costumes.  Ruth made punch for all the rooms.  Everybody had lots of fun I’m sure.

 

The night of Halloween was here

The people dressed in costumes queer

One like a witch, one like a cat

Came one after another over the mat.

 

Black cats sleek from shadows deep

Ghosts are awakened from troubled sleep

Children play and laugh and squeal

But shivery and most frightened feel.

 

The witches on their broom did fly,

Through the black and misty sky,

With glowing pumpkins right on hand

Casting mystery o’er the land.

 

–  Owena Peterson

 

San Gabriel Mission

 

 

On October 10, 1945 the Junior High and Mrs. Bessire went out to the Mission.  The first thing we saw was a small curio shop with mostly religious trinkets.

 

We went through an old iron gate and came into the patio filled with a beautiful growth of vegetation.  Here also was a fountain erected in memory of Junipero Serra the founder of the San Gabriel Mission.

 

We went up on a roof and the guide rang the bells for us.  He told us the original tower was destroyed by the earthquake of 1912 which did so much damage to the Mission.

 

The old church is still beautiful with its baptismial room and original altar, under which is buried seven priests.  We saw the Bible which was 363 years old, an organ with a movable keyboard one hundred and twenty-three years old and an old bedroom set over three hundred years old.

 

After we saw the beautiful relics we went into a room with a convex mirror used by the priests to see what the Indians were doing, and then into the yard where the old tanneries and soap vats were.  This is what San Gabriel Mission was noted for in the early days.

 

 

–    Marilyn Singer and Russell Gerling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHRISTMAS AT MAR-KEN

   At Christmas there is always fun at Mar-Ken.  The different rooms upstairs had their own trees.  The week before all the students had drawn names of persons they would buy presents for and the last day before Christmas vacation they bought their gifts and put them under the tree.

 

But first the grades went downstairs to the big tree and had a program of Christmas Carols and music.  Then Mrs. Bessire introduced Dr. Grace Lawson who told us about her Christmases in many foreign countries.  It was interesting to know how the people of England, France, Poland, Switzerland, Bavaria, Holland and Palestine spent their Christmas.

 

Dr. Grace Lawson first told of her Christmas in England, when she was a little girl visiting relatives.  They had Michaelmas Eve when they had an old donkey bring in the Yule log.  She said that the same donkey had been bringing in the Christmas Greens for twenty years.  Michaelmas is a long time before Christmas at least to a small child waiting to have her first Christmas in old England.  Christmas Eve they all sat around the big fire and had spiced cider and some kind of meat pies which she did not like very well.

 

In Bavaria she stayed with a family of mountain folks. If a stranger came to the home of these poor folk and asked to stay they would not rent them a room unless they thought you needed rest and then they would take you in and do all they could to make you happy.  The folks where she stayed made a wonderful orange bread baked like a new moon.  Then they made her some lovely glass balls in many colors especially for her.  Each one in the family has their own glass pot and each one choses the color they like best to make their balls.  Dr. Lawson still has some of her Christmas tree balls made for her in the Bavarian mountains.

 

While she was attending the University at Warsaw she went home with her roommate to spend the Christmas holiday.  They took a sleigh ride to visit the famous carillon in Poland.   There was a legend that Poland would be free as long as the carillon remained in the tower.  They could hear the bells when they were miles away on the clear cold night they drove over to see and hear them.  Some of Hitler’s men took the bells down and carried them away. She did not know whether they melted them or not.

 

In Palestine she visited the site of the birthplace of the Christ.  A group of tourists went out on Christmas Eve to the mountain over-looking the village.  Just as the lights were beginning to come on in the town one of the party, a famous singer sang, “O Little Town of Bethlehem.”  That was she thought the best of all her Christmases.

 

After Dr. Lawson had answered questions of the students, Diedre Gale presented the new pins to the new society sponsored by the National Honor Society.  Then we all went back to the Junior High room and had the exchange of gifts and the school treats.  Christmas at Mar-Ken is always fun.

 

VALENTINE DAY

 

 

 

Our Valentine celebration was on February 21, this year.  The Junior High drew names form a hat, Russell’s to be exact.  We gave a valentine to the person we drew and any others we wished.  Pamela Payton made and brought a cake instead of valentines so everyone had a sweet valentine from Pamela.  Joel Davis brought little candy hearts which he and all of us enjoyed eating and reading both.

 

The last period of the day we opened our Valentine box which was decorated in red crepe paper, hearts and cupids. Betty Clark was postmaster and Owena Peterson and Pamela Payton were cupid’s messengers, to pass out the valentines.  Everyone received many lovely valentines.

 

We also played games and had lots of fun.  One of the games which was played was something like Gossip.  We all sat in a circle around the room and taking the word Valentine the first one made a sentence beginning with V, the second one’s sentence began with A and so on until all the letters of the word Valentine were used.  The story was quite amusing when it was finished.  Valentine refreshments and games were a lot of fun and all I believe had a good time, and look forward to Valentine Day next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EASTER IN CALIFORNIA

 

California is noted for it’s Easter Sunrise Services.  Although it is cold and sometimes damp in the early morning, a Sunrise Service is a heart warming spectacle.

 

At Amie McPherson’s Foursquare Sunrise service the space where it takes place in the Temple is “Indoor heated”.  They call it the Easter Fire Sunrise Service.

 

At the Hollywood Bowl Sunrise Service are held services with great splendor.  A choir of more than a hundred voices form a great cross of white during a part of the singing by dropping their black robes.  The bowl is always packed to the top of the hill.  Five trumpeters open the services and announce the sunrise when it is time.  They have men of all faiths on the platform to take part in the program.

 

Up at Forest Lawn in Glendale at the first break of dawn they let a flock of white pigeons loose.  They had over fifty thousand attending this year.  The services are at the foot of the Tower of Legends.

 

About the first Sunrise Service in California was the one on Mt. Roubdeaux in Riverside.  Thousands attend every year, some camping on the mountain all night in order to be there early enough Easter morning.  This cite dated back to early Mission days.

 

Easter always means vacation for us and we spent our vacation in many ways and places.  Joel Davis spoke about Easter gifts.  He said, “I know you probably think it is peculiar that I talk about the things I gave, but I think it is just as much fun in fact, more fun to give presents than to receive.  It’s fun because if you give good presents you know that the person you give to will like it.  So I have this bit of advice for you; when you give presents, don’t think of what you will get back, think only of what the other person will think of the present.  But now I’m getting off the subject.  I’m supposed to talk about Easter vacation and I start giving you advice which you probably don’t need.

 

Several of the children brought pretty colored Easter eggs on the last day of school before vacation so we all ate hard boiled eggs at our lunch time.

 

 

 

 

THE MAR-KEN MAY DAY CELEBRATION

 

The May Day Celebration was really a success.  It was put on by the Intermediate grades and Junior High School with the parents and the High School and he faculty as the audience.

 

There was an excellent program of singing, dancing and magic tricks, followed by the traditional May Pole dances.   One dance by each room.  After this a committee from the High School crowned the best dancers from each dance as king and queen of the May.  David Ackles and Sally Ackles were crowned from the Intermediate group and James Miller and Marilyn Singer from the Junior High.  The girls wore crowns of flowers while the boys had crowns of leaves.

 

After the program refreshments were sold.  Junior High had a hot dog table prepared by Ruthie.  The Intermediates had a table of cookies, cup cakes and punch.  Ruthie’s hotdogs sold like hotdogs and her punch was heavenly.

 

After the celebration the cleanup committee took down the lovely flower decorations made of crepe paper, the May pole and when chairs and tales were put away the celebration was over for this year.

 

 

–  –  Robin Levinson

 

 

MAY DAY

 

May Day is so much fun

With hot dogs and fat buns,

Laughter and singing

Voices are ringing

Everyone happy and gay

That’s Mar-Ken’s May Day.

 

–       – Donna Ardoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEFINFICTIONS

 

Comprised, sritten and thunk up by Joel Davis,

(and stolen from Newspapers.)

 

MAR-KEN ANIMAL . . This book that you are now reading.

 

HAM AND EGGS . .  Bob Hope and his script.

 

COMMA . .  Part of the song, “Comma to me, my Melancholy Baby.”

 

LIGHT . . Something that if a cigarette hasn’t got, it won’t.

 

BEWITCHES . . Part of the song, “I’ll bewitches in apple blossom time.”

 

PATRIOT . . One who won’t listen to treason.

 

INCITE . . To view as in the sentence, “I looked down the street and nobody was

incite.”

 

SAYLOR . . A seafarer that talks too much.

 

TRANS-PARENT . . A father whose son can see through him.

 

CAIN . . The only man who killed his brother because he wasn’t Abel.

 

WASHINGTON MONUMENT . . The only thing in Washington, D.C. today that has a

point to it.

 

DOGHNUTS . . Only industry in the world built around nothing.

 

MOUTH . . Something that men and fish are safe until they open theirs.

 

COLD CASH . .Money that nobody keeps long enough to get it warmed up.

 

ALCOHOL . . A liquid that makes smokeless powder, synthetic rubber, and darn fools.

 

SPINAL COLUMN . . A bunch of bones that keeps your legs from running clear up to

your neck.

 

DIET . . A method of cutting expanses.

 

PRICES AND WAGES . . Two things that never meet each other even when they’re

both going in the same direction.

 

GENTLEMAN . . One who steps on his cigarette butt so it won’t burn the carpet.

 

THE END . . A thing the writer uses when he can’t think up no more.

 

POETRY

 

  PEACE

 

P stands for peace, so good and so fine,

E stands for excellence, but it won’t rhyme;

A stands for ambition, to keep the U.N.O.

C stands for care, which we have to have you know,

E stands for enterprize, which the whole world needs;

And the U.N.O. is the water, for peace’s seeds.

Russell Gerling.

 

 

P is for president who rules us with great care;

E is for endeavor which democracy encourages;

A is for admiration which we must give;

C is for contributions great and small

E is for energy which we must give to make this peace.

Owena Peterson

 

 

P is for the priceless links of friendships

E means that it’s elastic and can be bent,

A is for aggressive for that we can’t let slip.

C is for congruity which we can sometimes mend,

E is for education for have that we must,

To keep up our good old American trust.

Betty Joan Clark

 

 

P is for peace

In which we should all have a part.

E is for efficiency

Which we all should have.

A is for ambition

Which we should not be without.

C is for cooperation

Which we need to keep united.

E is enlargement

Of democratic ideas.

 

 

EXPLANATION TO TEACHER FOR ORIGINAL POETRY

 

Though this seems a total loss,

I tried very hard, Miss Ross,

I worked all day and even worked all night

And though it isn’t finished

And though it seems diminished,

I think it’s pretty good, well quite.

 

I know it doesn’t seem good,

I know they’ve never been good,

I think my doing right would be impossible.

I think it’s hard to do!

I try hard to please you.

Now don’t you think that my excuse is plausible?

 

– Joel Davis

 

 

ALL THE DAY

Owena says to a boy,

All she says is oi;

Nothing else does she,

All the Day.

Joel says to a dress,

All he says is Yes.

Nothing else does he say,

All the Day.

Donna sasys to a boy who’s old

All she says to him is “mole”.

Nothing else does she say.

All the Day

Armond says nothing with sheen

All he says is ‘The Corn’s Green’.

Nothing else does he say,

All the Day.

Pamela says to a body who says “Boo”,

All she says is “Why you Shoo”

Nothing else does she say

All the Day.

James says to a girl, who says “Who”

All he says is “Go too”.

Nothing else does he say,

All the day.

 

–       Russell Gerling

                         OUR ROOM

Our room is a jumble most of the time,

Especially when all the boys are here.

When Joel starts babbling off rhyme,

Russell, James and Armond are near.

 

Miss Ross has a tough job,

Even with the girls,

When Betty, Owena and I,

Send everything a-whirl.

 

When lunch time comes every day,

The word is “What ya got to trade?”

And Russell digging in his bag,

All the time that we played.

 

Then our history class,

Learning about Balboa and the Hudson Bay

We hope that will make us pass

On our sad report card day.

 

On our Christmas vacation

We had a short rest,

And back we all came

With our hearts full of jest.

 

– Pamela Payton

 

 

                         PEACE

Peace is something we are looking for,

And striving so hard for, too.

Peace is something we adore,

We hope we can keep THIS peace true.

 

We don’t want any more strife,

Not even just a quarrel,

The world has spent its life

Getting in one big snarl.

 

We want to stop all debate,

And make our country agree

That to make this real United States,

We must work together to be free.

 

–       Owena Peterson

   PURPLE PILLOW

 

The day is dark and dreary

And I am weak and weary

Would you like to querry

As to why I’m weak and weary?

 

 

 

 

MY REASON

 

Baddly battered and baddly bent

Into one more store I went.

Looking high and looking low,

I went to find a purple pillow

That would sing like a weeping willow

And send me off to sleeping.

 

I found a purple pillow

That sang like a weeping willow

And stopped me from my weeping

And sent me off to sleeping

But soon my purple pillow

Lost the voice of a weeping willow,

There isn’t another in town

I’ve looked all up and down!

Oh! What I’d give for a pillow

That sings like a weeping willow.

 

Now you know why I’’m

Weak and weary

And the day is dark and dreary

But if you find a pillow

Which sings like a weeping willow

Please!  Send it to me,

By Postal Delivery.

 

 

–  James Miller

 

 

 

 

 

TED DISCOVERS AMERICA

 

Ted thought he discovered America,

In nineteen hundred and forty-two,

When he found this was West India

He came down with the flue.

 

Joel was Ted’s assistant,

A very good one you know,

He looked for land and shore

To see if there was any snow.

 

When they got to the island,

They were met by Indian: Betty,

She said, “Won’t you come in,

And have some spaghetti?”

 

Donna wanted to meet them

Very badly you know,

But since Betty didn’t introduce her,

She went off to the show.

 

They told them what they were looking for,

And all at once here comes Pam,

She told them where they could find it

If they would hurry and scram.

 

So they hunted around for spice

And what did they find but James

Talking with Cartier,

On the Spanish Main.

 

On and on they went

Hunting for spice with strife,

But all they found was Robin,

Who had just saved Captain John Smith’s life.

 

They kept right at their job,

And then they saw Marilyn,

With the spices in her hand

And her face was in a grin.

 

She said, “Chief Russell in the Wind,

Would lead them any day

To find their fortunes one and all

If they would be on their way.

 

–    Owena Peterson

THE SUN

 

The sun looks down upon the hills,

Upon the soil where farmers till.

To till the soil, ‘pon which the sun beats down,

And to have his crop yield a golden brown.

 

To set each man in his individual place,

To make each man walk his own decisive pace.

It sets him under an apple tree,

And sets him wondering ‘pon the things he sees.

 

And if we were to ride on a golden cloud,

We would shout, and shout, and shout very loud.

And the Sun would look on us and be proud,

And we would shout, and shout, and shout very loud.

– Ted Donaldson

MY GARDEN

The flowers in my garden,

Are surrounded by a wall.

And violets are so dainty;

The hollyhocks are so tall.

The roses by the trellis,

And the daisies by the walk,

Perhaps could tell a story,

If they could only talk.

 

–  Sally Ackles

A GOBBLER IN TROUBLE

 

Oh! What would the turkey gobbler do,

If he got the hiccoughs before he was through

With his gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble?

 

I’m sure that he could never see through the joke

If he started to gobble and stopped to choke,

With his gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble.

 

The puffed out fool would grow red in the face,

And the hens would laugh at their lord’s disgrace,

At his gobble, his gobble, his gobble, gobble, gobble.

 

–   Margaret Follette

   WINTER

 

Winter is here.

It brings good cheer.

Everybody’s happy and gay

They wish it would stay.

Then the spring comes in,

Then summer

And fall

Then the good old winter

Time

It rolls by like a new

Dime.

–  Karol Bush

   THE BUNNY

 

I saw a little bunny

Come hopping cross the lawn

The sun was just arising,

In the early part of dawn.

 

He had a busy tail,

Which bobbed along so white;

His fur was Oh! So very clean

He made a pretty sight.

 

But when I turned away

To put him on my right

He had disappeared so quickly,

And was far, far, out of sight.

 

 

   MY WILLOW TREE

 

There is a little garden that belongs to me,

And in this little garden there is a willow tree,

Where Mother sometimes sits with me,

And we can watch the sea.

Every morning my willow tree

Waves its leafy arms to me,

And then I go out and see

My little willow tree.

 

–   Gloria McGibbon

HISTORICAL EVENTS –  1946
THROUGH HISTORY WITH THOSE WHO MADE HISTORY

 

William Bradford

SO THEY COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE WILL OF GOD AND RESOLVED TO PROSEEDE.

 

George Berkeley

WESTWARD THE COURSE OF EMPIRE TAKES ITS WAY.

 

James Otis

TAXATION WITHOUIT REPRESENTATION IS TYRANNY.

 

Patrick Henry

GIVE ME LIBERTY, OR GIVE ME DEATH!

 

Nathan Hale

I REGRET THAT I HAVE BUT ONE LIFE TO LOSE FOR MY COUNTRY.

 

Thomas Paine

THESE ARE THE TIMES THAT TRY MEN’S SOULS.

 

Charles Pickney

MILLIONS FOR DEFENCE, BUT NOT ONE CENT FOR TRIBUTE.

 

Captain James Lawrence

DON’T GIVE UP THE SHIP!

 

Daniel Webster

LIBERTY AND UNION, NOW AND FOREVER, ONE AND INSEPARABLE.

 

Henry Clay

I WOULD RATHER BE RIGHT THAN PRESIDENT.

 

Abraham Lincoln

THAT THIS NATION, UNDER GOD, SHALL HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM, AND THAT GOVERNEMENT OF THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERSISH FROM THE EARTH.

 

Tecumseh Sherman

HOLD THE FORT. I AM COMING.

 

Ulysses S. Grant

I PROPOSE TO FIGHT IT OUT ON THIS LINE, IF IT TAKES ALL SUMMER.

 

Thomas Alva Edison

THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR HARD WORK.

 

Theodore Roosevelt

THERE IS ROOM HERE FOR ONLY 100 PERCENT AMERICANISM.

 

Israel Zangwill

AMERICA IS THE GREAT MELTING POT.

 

Woodrow Wilson

THE WORLD MUST BE MADE SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY

 

Calvin Coolidge

THERE IS NO RIGHT TO STRIKE AGAINST THE PUBLIC SAFETY BY ANYBODY, ANYWHERE, ANYTIME.

 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

THE HEART OF THIS NATION IS SOUND * THE SPIRIT OF THIS NATION IS STRONG * THE FAITH OF THIS NATION IS ETERNAL.

WOULD HISTORY CHANGE IF  –

 

JAMES STAYED IN HIS SEAT AND STUDIED

DONNA STOPPED CALLING MARILYN “MOLE”.

JOEL STOPPED CRACKING HIS JOKES.

MARILYN EVER STOPPED BAWLING OUT DONNA.

RUSSELL STOPPED BEING A WOLF.

PAMELA WASN’T TEASED.

TED DIDN’T WORK SO MUCH.

ROBIN BECAME NOISY INSTEAD OF QUIET.

ARMOND DID ANYTHING RIGHT.

OWENA STOPPED EATING.

IF BETTY STOPPED SINGING.

 

 

THE HISTORY OF MAR-KEN

 

In 1923 Viola F. Lawlor founded a school which later became Mar-Ken but was first called the Hollywood Professional Children’s School.  The first student body numbered five people.  Mrs. Lawlor felt a definite need for a College Preparatory School for the child working, in the studios, and developed a course of study both suitable and practical for this purpose.

 

Five years later when the school was to be incorporated the name was changed to Lawlor Professionals’ School.

 

In 1936, at Mrs. Lawlor’s retirement from business, Mrs. Bessire was appointed manager and director of the school.  The name of the school was changed again, this time to Mar-Ken, which means Vision and Service.

 

The school has grown in student body and faculty, and in the fall of 1939 became fully accredited with all universities and colleges of the United States.

 

Mar-Ken School bases its objective upon the development of the student’s character and knowledge.  It is dedicated to the advancement of noble ideals and high learning.

 

The program of Mar-Ken is planned for busy students who are interested in obtaining in a short time a good knowledge of history, geography, literature, languages, arithmetic and spelling with an appreciation of music and art.

 

–  Owena Peterson

JUNIOR HIGH THOUGHTS ON HISTORY

 

History is something everybody should know.  This term we have had a very interesting history study.  The first semester we studied briefly the founding of our country and on up through the years.   We had different units including, discovery, exploration, colonial days and civics.  This gave us a background of our country which will help us understand as we study history further in High School and college.

 

The second semester we have been studying Legislative, Executive and Judicial Departments and how several of our laws function.  We have gained a  knowledge of how to, (if not expertly, to some degree) gauge current events by a knowledge of our Constitution.

 

We had short units on various fights for rights, such as the fights by labor, capital, industry, women suffrage, and the territorial growth of our land.

 

We learned where many of our ideas and beliefs have come from and with our study of Current Events I now feel that I can talk of political happenings and not have to sit back and just listen.  If I don’t say anything, I at least have the satisfaction of knowing what they are speaking about.

 

I’d say that history is the main subject in school, but it is not the easiest.  It gives us the foundation of our life.  History repeats itself over and over again therefore we should learn the mistakes of the past and not make the same mistakes ourselves.  From every part of the world we have gained something whether it be good or bad.  If more people knew history this world might be a lot different and I think better than it is now.

 

 

Owena Peterson put her thoughts in poetic form.  Here are two of her verses.

 

I learned a lot in history

About Crusades and Reniassance,

And even about Columbus and Cabot

And I learned a lot, believe it or not.

 

I surely enjoyed the history course,

And I learned my history too.

And even though a little hard,

I enjoyed it the whole year through.

 

MY FAVORITE HISTORICAL PICTURE

 

 

 

 

My favorite historical picture was, “The Bandit of Sherwood Forest.”  This picture starred Cornel Wilde and Anita Louise.  It was the story of Robin Hood’s son, Robert, and breaking down another tyranny.  It was a fast moving picture in Technicolor, and showed Little John, Will Scarlet and all of Robin Hood’s men.  It was exciting, taking you back to the days of the stone towers in old England.  The acting, archery and the fencing was wonderful.  It just made you want to read more about England and her early history.  I think everyone who didn’t see the picture missed something great and those who did see “The Bandit of Sherwood Forest” enjoyed it and want to see it again.

 

–   Pamela Payton

 

 

 

 

 

My favorite historical picture is, “Kitty,” which takes place in 1783.  The setting is London.  It’s about a girl, named Kitty who was born in the slums of London called Houndsditch.  Kitty is a young girl who is the ward of a smuggler and pickpocket called Old Meg

 

Old Meg is bringing Kitty up as a pickpocket.  One day Kitty is walking past the home of the famous artist Thomas Gainsborough.  She tries to steal his shoes and is caught.  When Gainsborough sees her he wants to paint a portrait of her.  The portrait is exhibited at the Royal Academy of Art and a duke becomes interested in Kitty.  The rest of the story tells of Kitty’s rise to fame and fortune.

 

–   Robin Anne Levinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT VICTORY MEANS TO ME

 

Victory means peace.  But peace brings problems. The reconvertion of our industry from war materials to peace-time manufacturing. It will take a long time to completely reconvert.  Then there are the wounded soldiers and sailors to care for and help.  All this will take time and money.  The war-torn countries will be asking for great sums of money.  We have our National debt to pay.  Some people think we can’t afford to loan money but others think it is our duty.  We are the only country that is big and strong enough to loan money.  These are some of the problems that Peace brings.

 

Victory is a wonderful thing.  But victory and peace are two different things for the countries that won and those that were defeated.

 

Germany knows about the atomic bomb. So if we give her too much leeway she may perfect it and use it on us.  That is another problem our great men are worrying about now.

 

It is all these things which will bar our way to complete our peace. It is going to be harder to keep peace than to acquire it.  The United Nations are trying to keep peace between all the nations.  We don’t want to lose all that the Revolutionists, the Civil War Armies, the First World War Veterans and the Second World War combatants fought for and gave some even their lives.  We have to keep what they fought to win.  We must keep the flag flying.

Pamela Payton

 

 

When the Germans were defeated we were just half way to victory.  For we had the Japanese to conquer yet, but now both of these countries, that were so sure each one of them were going to rule the world, are in consequence worse off than anyone else.  They are without food, clothing, transportation and things a nation needs to live.

 

Take China, for instance, she has been fighting with Japan for about nine years.  Now she is just going back to her homes. They are getting started again, but as we know  they do not have enough food, clothing, or anything like that.  Perhaps if they work hard as the people of China has always done they will be able to build up their nation.

 

After knowing what so many people have gone through, and are still going through, victory means so very much to me and to everyone.  It means that we can settle down and start our factories to building things for homes instead of tanks, planes, jeeps, or things for war. It means we can do things we’ve wanted to do since 1941.  But there is one thing that will hold up the victory everyone wants so much and that is the large amount of strikes, which are raging over the country.  So the first we must settle these things between the people, before we can get things for our nation as a whole.

 

Betty Joan Clark

WHAT VICTORY MEAN TO ME

 

by DONNA ARDOFF

 

 

 

VICTORY and PEACE are the most wonderful things to me, not only to me but I’m most sure it means to everyone the two most important things in the whole world now.

 

Take China for instance.  China has been fighting and defending her helpless nation for eight years.  I guess many people during 1934-35 didn’t think much about the countries at war, but soon as “Pearl Harbor” was bombed more than ninety percent of those people that didn’t care about our Allies woke up to war and its conditions.

 

Just think what would happen if our American cause would have lost.  If that would have happened VICTORY and PEACE would have been another two words in our vocabulary.

 

VICTORY and PEACE are here to stay if YOU keep it here by that I mean the boys and girls that will become the American citizens of tomorrow.  Our boys and girls of today, in order to have VICTORY and keep it should help in any and every way possible.  Help the Red Cross, the cripples children, the Relief Societies and all the famous organizations which are so wonderful here in America.

 

When you are asked to contribute to any organization don’t look at that shiny new nickel or dime or dollar and say NO, I don’t have any money to give. I’m sure that the corner drug store would rather have you give your money for something worthy than an ice cream soda.

 

VICTORY is here.  WILL YOU keep it here to stay?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VICTORIES

 

There have been many kinds of victories.  The fight for suffrage for women was won, not by warfare but by talks and speeches.  Susan B. Anthony was a great fighter.  She did not let any one boss her around.  She went from town to town stirring up the women to fight for their rights.  She said that all people are created equal and the women should have the right to vote.  It was in 1854 that Susan B. Anthony started her life long career of agitation for the rights of women.  She lived to see women vote but not to gain their complete rights.  Francis E. Willard was another suffragette and many other women fought bravely and hard for the rights women now enjoy.

 

Florence Nightingale attained a great triumph as the first female nurse ever to serve in war.  Her father taught her science, mathematics and classics.  At a very early age she showed a great desire to lesson human suffering.  When she was twenty-four she went on a tour of European hospitals.  Seven years later she entered upon a course of study in training for nursing and at the start of the Crimean War in 1854, Florence Nightingale and thirty other women, trained as nurses arrived at the battle fields to take charge of the military hospital.  They stayed at the front with the soldiers until the war was won.  After the war she became very active in trying to better the conditions in hospitals because they were extremely unsanitary.  She wrote many books on the subject.

 

 

 

VICTORY

 

The greatest victory I ever knew was on the football field one autumn day.  The game was tied seven to seven and we needed six more points in three minutes.

 

There I stood, left end for our team.  The words rang out like a bell to me, “Signals on, 3,7,8,42.”  The game was on again. Down went the runner.  The ball bounced into my arms and all of a sudden I was running to save my school.  One yard, two yards, three yards, the ground passed under my feet like I was flying.  I shook two tackles off and ran on when All of a sudden a cry came from the sidelines, “Look out.”  I looked up; a goal post stared me in the face.

 

The game had been won.  Fifty-two yards to victory for our team.  I think that run was my greatest victory.

 

–  James Miller

 

 

 

 

A MYSTERIOUS VICTORY

 

The first thing you must know, is that my hobby is magic.  Almost every Friday night I go to the Hollywood Magic Shop near Vine Street.  There is a club for kids there and every Friday night several youngsters do a show.

 

The moment you do one you become a member of the club.  About eight weeks ago they started a contest.  All members would do a show.  About two every time, for eight weeks.  The winner of each week would compete in the final contest.  The winner of the final contest would receive a prize.  Well, I’m a member so I was called upon to do a show.

 

Luckily for me, I’ve been doing lots of magic shows with one set routine.  But for this week, I felt it needed something else.  So, I worked up a new trick.  Friday night finally came and I went to the club.  There was another fellow doing a show the same night.  He went on first.  Everybody seemed to like it.  After his show, he received a very good ovation.  Now it was my turn.  I got up, went through (at least to me) without anything going wrong.

 

By the way, the winner is recorded by applause.  Well, the M.C. held his hand over one fellow.  Applause.  There I was, I didn’t know to whom he pointed.  Then, suddenly applause for another fellow.

 

I’m competing in the finales.  Seems like I won that night.

 

 

–   Ted Donaldson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PEACE THOUGHTS THROUGH THE AGES

 

Proverbs

HER WAYS ARE WAYS OF PLEASANTNESS, AND ALL HER PATHS ARE PEACE.

 

Patrick Henry

IS LIFE SO DEAR, OR PEACE SO SWEET, AS TO BE PRUCHASED AT THE PRICE OF CHAINS AND SLAVERY?

 

Letter to Quincy

THERE NEVER WAS A GOOD WAR OR A BAD PEACE.

 

Odyssey

WAR IT’S THOUSANDS SLAYS, PEACE IT’S TEN THOUSANDS.

 

Jeremiah

PEACE, PEACE, WHEN THERE IS NOT PEACE.

 

Isaiah

THERE IS NOT PEACE, SAITH THE LORD, UNTO THE WICKED.

 

Campbell

THE METIOR FLAG OF ENGLAND SHALL YET TERRIFIC BURN, TILL DANGER’S TROUBLED NIGHT DEPART AND THE STAR OF PEACE RETURNS.

 

Psalms

PEACE BE WITHIN THY WALLS AND PROSPERITY WITHIN THEY PALACES

 

Milton

PEACE HATH HER VICTORIES NO LESS RENOWED THAN WAR.

 

Essay on Man

REASON’S WHOLE PLEASURE, ALL THE JOY OF SENSE LIE IN THREE WORDS – HEALTH – PEACE AND COMPETENCE.

 

Moore

I KNOW BY THE SMOKE THAT SO GRACEFULLY CURLED ABOVE THE GREEN ELMS, THAT A COTTAGE WAS NEAR AND I SAID “IF THERE’S PEACE TO BE FOUIND IN THE WORLD, A HEART THAT WAS HUMBLE MIGHT HOPE FOR IT THERE.”

 

 

WHAT PEACE MEANS TO ASIA

 

Asia has about the oldest civilization known.  Asia contains some of the most important countries in the world.  China, India, Iran and most of Russia are in Asia.

At the present time, Russia and Iran are having a great argument.  Iran objects to Russia having troops in Iran.  They have brought the problem up before the United Nations Organization and at the request of both nations it was dropped.  Russia says she is going to remove her troops.

Russia is also having a dispute with China over Manchuria.  Manchuria is valuable to both nations.  Russia has been using Manchurian ports and rebuilding her railroads so that Russian locomotives can use them and Chinese locomotives cannot.  Russia is also taking the machinery the Japanese put into Manchuria back to Russia to rebuild her factories that were destroyed by war.

We do hope that this dispute can be settled peacefully, for peace in China will be like a new world to the Chinese people.

India is an interesting nation to talk about.  Right now she is trying to gain her independence from the British.  Before the war India tried to gain independence, but then war came, and India fought with England against Germany.  Now that the war is over England still refuses to give India independence.  Even if England gave her independence, India would not be peaceful, because the people all want something different.  The Hindus want one thing, the Moslems want another, and Native Princes want still another.

As we all know, India has always had one fifth as large a farming area than the United States and her industry hastened the end of the war.  They have the largest steel mills in the British Empire. India has mineral deposits only surpassed by the United States and Russia.

Now, we come to our enemy Japan.  Most of the people in Japan did not want war in the first place.   But after they started to conquer, they continued and fought hard.  They have been fighting China for years and now they have been defeated by the Allies at last.  The highest officials and officers in Japan during the war are being tried by the War Criminals Court.

As we have told you in the preceding paragraphs, there is a great deal of confusion in the world over two things:  1. Arguments over land and 2. Keeping the peace.  Really both things come under arguments.  It is good to argue sometimes to bring things into the open and settle them fairly, but the world will never get any place with continued arguments.

Peace is going to be different for Asia than it was before the war.  Many people are wondering how Asia is going to get along and Asia is wondering too.

 

 

 

PEACE

 

 

What DOES peace mean to the world?

 

What WILL peace mean to the world?

 

These are two questions that everyone is asking.  But is there an answer?

 

The world has been in such trouble and terrible destruction that we sometimes wonder will it ever be in construction again.  The countless millions that have been killed or an accident during this war, not only abroad but also right here in ‘America, could have been stopped except for a few people who thought they could rule the world.

 

The boys and girls right now are America’s tomorrow.  The world is strong and so are the minds in the world.  Some minds think good and some evil.  If the world starts out to be more democratic it will continue to stay that way.  But if some hypocrite wants to spoil it well that’s up to you.

 

Will the new world be in destruction or construction?

 

–       Donna Ardoff

 

 

 

If we want lasting peace everyone must cooperate.  We must settle our problems and avoid strikes.  All this should be done peaceably.  Workers must cooperate if we wish not to have strikes.  Unions must agree on wages, hours, etc.  This has to be done within the United States.  We can’t expect others to settle these things for us.

 

The U.N.O. must try to keep countries in friendship, because some day the world is going to need it.  These things must be settled before we can have lasting peace.

 

–       Pamela Payton

 

INTERMEDIATES

[ Mar-Ken School 1945-46 Grade School students ]

 

 

 

 

Gloria Jean McGibbon

 

Sally Ackles

 

Jacqueline Bredberg

 

David Ackles

 

Michael McGuire

 

Bob Anderson

 

Patricia Mae Flanigan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAY DAY 1946

 

 

January 13, was Navy Day Celebration in our harbor.  I went down to Long Beach and then out to the harbor.  First we went on a Beach Landing boat and went ten miles out in the ocean.  That was thrilling.

 

Then we got on a battle ship called the Alabama.  A sailor took us down on three decks and we went way below.  He took us into the rooms where they sleep and where they eat called the galley.

 

Then we went out to another ship called the Battleship Texas.  We stayed on there two hours visiting many interesting places.

 

 

 

 

WILLIE’S TRIP TO KANSAS CITY

 

 

Willie was just four years old. He and his mother and father were going to Kansas City, Missouri.  They started early one Sunday morning.  They reached Arizona about six o’clock that night.  They stopped at the Painted Desert for supper.

 

“Who painted it?” asked Willie.

 

“Mother Nature,” answered his mother without a smile.

 

Next day came New Mexico where Willie saw a papoose being carried on his mother’s back.

 

“Why don’t you ride me on your back?” asked Willie turning to his mother.

“Because you are not an Indian,” answered his mother.

 

Then they came to Texas where they saw more Indians who lived in adobe homes.

 

Then they came to Oklahoma City, then Kansas and on Tuesday night they arrived at Kansas City where Willie stayed a long time.

 

Jacqueline Bredberg

Grade 3A

 

 

 

 

 

THE STORY OF CALIFORNIA
THE TAR PITS

 

 

Thousands and thousands of years ago there were huge animals called dinosaurs.  They would be looking for water and would see something bubbling that looked like water.  Then they would step into the bubbling water but they found that they could not get out and that it wasn’t water.  They kept sinking lower and lower.  Then archaeologists dug deep into the bubbling water which was really tar and they found the huge bones of the dinosaurs.  It took them quite a few years to put them together, but finally they did get them put together.

The tar pits are still here in California.

Jacqueline Bredberg

Grade 4A

 

THE PANAMA CANAL

 

In 1882 a French company that had built the Suez Canal went to Panama to try and build what is now the Panama Canal.  They got a little of it finished when they decided that it was costing too much money and too many lives, because of the yellow fever.

In the Spanish War the United States found a canal very necessary.  After the war the United States made an agreement with England, so that both would have rights to the canal, and an agreement with Panama for the United States to have rights to build the canal.

Before the canal could be started we had to conquer the diseases.  It took quite a while, but we finally did it.  Then the canal could be worked on.  Now the canal isn’t big enough for the modern ships.  Most of the ships are too large to use the canal, so now the canal will have to be enlarged, or a larger one built.  Now there is a pretty big problem in Panama.

Sally Ackles

Grade 5A,

 

 

THE DISCOVERY OF THE NEW WORLD

 

The discovery of the New World was an accident. Columbus who discovered the New World, was sailing for India.  When Columbus discovered the New World, he thought it was India and called the natives Indians.  Amerigo Vespucci told about the New World and people named the New World America for Amerigo Vespucci.

 

David Ackles

Grade 3A

 

A VISIT TO SAN GABRIEL MISSION

 

We took a trip to San Gabriel Mission this year.  We saw an old kitchen and a very crude oven.  Out on the terrace there were doves and we bought some food and fed them.  There was also a cemetery and old Indian graves.  Our trip to the Mission was very interesting.  There is a grape vine there about one hundred years old.

 

Gloria McGibbon

Grade 6A

 

 

THE EARLY HEBREWS

 

The early Hebrews were wandering shepherds in the Arabian desert. Genesis, the first book of the Old Testament, tells of many Hebrew leaders.  The first of these was Abraham.  He drove his flocks from the Ur of the Chaldees which was a city near the mouth of the Euphrates River to the land of Canaan which was south of Phonicia.  There he found pastures for his large flocks and herds.

Among Abraham’s descendants were Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph one of the twelve brothers who was taken by merchants into Egypt and sold there as a slave.  Because he was able to interpret Pharaoh’s dreams, he was given a position of great honor next to the king himself.

The early Hebrews left a remarkable heritage to the world.  They were not lovers of art and beauty like the Egyptians nor lovers of science like the Babylonians.  They did not invent ways of doing things.  Their gift was another kind.  The Hebrews were the first people to teach of One God, who was just and kind and who required justice and kindness of all men.

Patsy Mae Flanigan

Grade 6A

 

 

 

WHAT THE WORLD OWES THE PHOENICIANS

 

The world owes a lot to the Phoenicians for they were the first great traders in the world.  As the Phoenicians traded, they found out all about the peoples of other lands.  For example, they would go to one town and learn about the people there and then go to another city and carry the ideas of the people there to the next town.  In that way they learned a lot about other people and so carried ideas to other civilizations to the people.   But that’s not all.  Where did we get the alphabet?  No, it wasn’t the Greeks, it was the Phoenicians.  Yes, they gave us the alphabet.  The alphabet was developed by the Romans and Greeks but originally came from the Phoenicians. So don’t you think we owe a lot to the Phoenicians?

David Ackles

Grade 3A

3242 Veteran Ave.

Los Angeles, Calif.

May 9, 1946

 

 

Dear Mary,

 

I wish you could have been with us when we took our trip

to South America.

 

First we went to Venezuela.  We saw a lot of mestizo and

mulatto people.  We saw hundreds of oil wells. The people there

can’t read or write very much.

 

Second we went to Columbia.  The people there are mestizo,

mulatto, white, and a few Indians.  We visited Bogota which is the

capital.  Columbia is one of the most democratic and progressive

countries in Latin-America.

 

Third, we came to the Guianas, then Ecuador, Brazil, Peru,

Paraguay, Bolivia, Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile.  We saw many

interesting things and we collected many fine and different

souvenirs.

 

 

Your friend,

Jacqueline Bredberg

Grade 4 A

 

 

A VISIT TO OLVERA STREET

 

One day the teacher said that we would take a trip to Olvera Street.  Kent Bessire took us in the big car.  When we arrived we found that it really was not a street but a short alley.  We went there because we were studying Mexico.  We saw an old cart made of wood and held together by hide strips. There were a lot of little shops.  There was a jewelry shop, a candle shop, and a restaurant and many other shops.

 

Gloria McGibbon

Grade 6A

 

 

 

 

THE MAY DAY FESTIVAL

 

On May the first our school had a May Day Festival.  It was very beautiful.  The program was made up of dancers and singers and one magician.  After that we had two Maypole dancers. Then our room sold sweets and we made $11.37.  My sister and I won the crowns for our room; Marilyn Singer and James Miller won the crowns for the Junior High.  I had lots of fun at the Festival.

 

David Ackles

Grade 3A

 

 

 

 

Mar-Ken had a May Day Festival on May 1st, 1946.  We entertained the mothers and had two maypole dances.  The best dancers got crowns. In our room Sally and David Ackles won the crowns.  One crown was made of leaves and one of flowers.  After the entertainment we had hot dogs and cookies and cakes.  It was a very enjoyable party.

 

Gloria McGibbon

Grade 6A

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE:  The 1946 Mar-Ken Intermediate and Junior High School Yearbook contains photographs of:

 

M. Ethel Bessire, Mar-Ken School Director

Kent Bessire, her son

Mrs. Lydia Peterson, school administrator; sister of Mrs. Bessire

Annie J. Ross, Principal of the Intermediate and Junior High Schools.